SBTi, GHG protocol, or TCFD which framework?

SBTi: Science Based Targets to Net Zero:

Key requirements of the Net-Zero Standard
  1. Focus on rapid, deep emission cuts: Rapid, deep cuts to value-chain emissions are the most effective and scientifically-sound way of limiting global temperature rise to 1.5°C. This is the central focus of the Net-Zero Standard and must be the overarching priority for companies. The Net-Zero Standard covers a company’s entire value chain emissions, including those produced by their own processes (scope 1), purchased electricity and heat (scope 2), and generated by suppliers and end-users (scope 3). Most companies will require deep decarbonization of 90-95% to reach net-zero under the Standard
  2. Set near- and long-term targets: Companies adopting the Net-Zero Standard are required to set both near-term and long-term science-based targets. This means making rapid emissions cuts now, halving emissions by 2030. By 2050, organizations must produce close to zero emissions and will neutralise any residual emissions that are not possible to eliminate
  3. No net-zero claims until long-term targets are met: A company is only considered to have reached net-zero when it has achieved its long-term science-based target. Most companies are required to have long-term targets with emission reductions of at least 90-95% by 2050. At that point, a company must use carbon removals to neutralize any limited emissions that cannot yet be eliminated.
  4. Go beyond the value chain: The SBTi recommends Companies to go further by making investments outside their science-based targets to help mitigate climate change elsewhere. There is an urgent need to scale up near-term climate finance; however, these investments should be in addition to deep emission cuts, not instead of them. Companies should follow the mitigation hierarchy, committing to reduce their value chain emissions before investing to mitigate emissions outside their value chains

https://sciencebasedtargets.org/net-zero


GHG Protocol Corporate Standard

The GHG Protocol Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard provides requirements and guidance for companies and other organizations preparing a corporate-level GHG emissions inventory.

The standard covers the accounting and reporting of seven greenhouse gases covered by the Kyoto Protocol – carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PCFs), sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) and nitrogen trifluoride (NF3). It was updated in 2015 with the Scope 2 Guidance, which allows companies to credibly measure and report emissions from purchased or acquired electricity, steam, heat, and cooling.

https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

An exploration into TCFD has been explored at length in a previous blog post.

Carbon Budgeting:

A Carbon Budget is set, much like a financial budget, and an organisation tries to figure out how to stick to it. For countries:

https://greeneconomytracker.org/policies/carbon-budgeting

Carbon budgeting is a deceptively simple idea with profound implications. Just like any other budget, the idea is to set a fixed amount of carbon that a country is allowed to emit over a set period, and then work to keep within that limit. Scientists have worked out how much more carbon can be emitted globally to keep global heating below the 2°C target, or the 1.5°C ambition, in the Paris Agreement; country-level carbon budgets attempt to parcel out the planetary budget into national chunks.

https://www.globalcarbonproject.org/carbonbudget/index.htm